Street Art: Steve McIntosh

Street Art Steve McIntosh

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Steve McIntosh taught himself to draw at a young age by reading and imitating DC and Marvel superhero comics. ‘My drawing feels more technical than artistic; puzzles, crosswords and historical facts influence my thoughts and occupy my time, though my work comes from my imagination. I don’t feel in any rush when working, just take my time, each line is considered, not instinctive. I’m not sure why my landscapes and towns often lack people, maybe because I like solitude.’

Street Art: Andy Bick

Andy Bick

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Andy Bick from Worcester experienced a long period of homelessness, including living in a hostel for several years, and before that rough sleeping and sofa-surfing. He now lives in his own rented flat. He started drawing cartoons as a means of communicating with his 90-year-old mother. “I intended for these cartoons to have a simplistic style,” he says. “I felt it would be wrong or a distraction to Beano-ize the homeless. It was important for them to look like something homeless folk could relate to.”

Street Art: Stephen Mundy

Stephen Mundy

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Stephen Mundy served two years of a four-year prison sentence at HMP Lewes, Sussex. “I created this image (pictured above) just before I was due to be released from HMP Lewes, Sussex after serving two years of a four-year prison sentence,” says Stephen. “While I was in prison I was given the choice of working in the workshop, or going to education, I chose education. I was very mentally ill, and practising art was a real benefit to my mental health. I applied to college on release but didn’t have anywhere to live. That’s where this piece of art fits in – boarded-up houses, a man with a rucksack, scratching his head, thinking “where to now?” Luckily since release, I have been in temporary, supported housing, and doing well at college.”

Stephen Mundy

Street Art: Anthony Pye

Anthony Pye

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Antony Pye suffers from psychosis and was homeless for a long period of time after being kicked out of his parents’ house. After staying in different places including a tent, a boat and a garden shed, he now finally has a flat of his own. “I do not want anybody experiencing what I had to,” he says, “I want to help those who are in need by the distribution of survival goods starting off with survival blankets with art on them.”

Street Art: Mary Vallely

Mary Vallely

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Mary Vallely studied art and design for five years in college and has been working as an artist in London for 10 years, selling and exhibiting work through Café Art and Crisis. She has a history of homelessness and uses day Centre’s to access art materials. “Art helps with my depression,” says Mary. “I love using colour, it helps my mood. The sadder I am the more colour comes out, the pain becomes beautiful. I love to experiment and my art is always changing and evolving.”

Mary Vallely

Street Art: Stavros Enilaou

Street Art Print

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Stavros Enilaoui is a Greek national originally from North Africa who came to the UK five years ago. He was reintroduced to painting – something he had enjoyed as a youth – via the 240 Project, a West London arts and health activity centre for people affected by homelessness, vulnerability and exclusion, whom he approached for support while rough sleeping on Ladbroke Grove. Painting for Stavros is a joyous thing that comes from a happy place.

Street Art: Tom Mccarthaigh

Tom The Prince

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Tom Mccarthaigh is a freelance illustrator who specialises in pencil and pen ink drawing. Mccarthaigh loves working with stories and tries to create a feeling of empathy with the characters he draws. This year one of his images was chosen for the hologram on the Bristol one pound notes. Mccarthaigh current aim is to work with authors and decorate their stories with illustrations.

“I would like to give my thanks to anyone interested in my artwork, your support is a great motivation for me. This image entitled ‘Prince’ (shown above) is based on a story a friend from Thailand told me. The story follows a prince who loses his birthright, becomes homeless and then has to go on a long journey through many hardships and challenges. I partly based the story of my long experiences in psychiatric care and dealing with trauma. I knew many people who were very damaged and unable; to me, they were lost Princes and Princes who had lost their lives. They had faded memories of the lives they used to lead and the people they used to be. To me, this was the most tragic part of living with the long-term effects of psychosis.”

Street Art: David Martin

David Martin

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

David Martin is a Big Issue vendor whose pitch is at Hammersmith in London. His love of Henri Matisse inspired him to try his hand at producing his own artworks, comprising abstract designs made from coloured card. “One of my customers took me to see Matisse paintings at the Tate Modern because he thought they were similar,” he says. “I was blown away.”

David Martin

Street Art: Andrew Howard

Andrew Howard Street Art

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Andrew Howard is from London and is a regular contributor to Street Art, working across a range of mediums from painting to poetry. He has struggled with mental health problems since 1986. His latest artwork (pictured above) responds to, he says, “the lunacy of knife crime”.

Andrew Howard Street Art Print

Street Art: Chris B And Mina

Chris B & Mina

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Chris B was born in central London and draws to relieve depression and anxiety. He also writes stories and has published several drawings in The Big Issue as well as other magazines. Mina came to London as a political exile. She has experienced an abusive relationship and strives to empower herself with art and photography. Mina and Chris work together on art projects.

Chris B & Mina