Street Art: Tom Mccarthaigh

Tom The Prince

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Tom Mccarthaigh is a freelance illustrator who specialises in pencil and pen ink drawing. Mccarthaigh loves working with stories and tries to create a feeling of empathy with the characters he draws. This year one of his images was chosen for the hologram on the Bristol one pound notes. Mccarthaigh current aim is to work with authors and decorate their stories with illustrations.

“I would like to give my thanks to anyone interested in my artwork, your support is a great motivation for me. This image entitled ‘Prince’ (shown above) is based on a story a friend from Thailand told me. The story follows a prince who loses his birthright, becomes homeless and then has to go on a long journey through many hardships and challenges. I partly based the story of my long experiences in psychiatric care and dealing with trauma. I knew many people who were very damaged and unable; to me, they were lost Princes and Princes who had lost their lives. They had faded memories of the lives they used to lead and the people they used to be. To me, this was the most tragic part of living with the long-term effects of psychosis.”

Street Art: David Martin

David Martin

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

David Martin is a Big Issue vendor whose pitch is at Hammersmith in London. His love of Henri Matisse inspired him to try his hand at producing his own artworks, comprising abstract designs made from coloured card. “One of my customers took me to see Matisse paintings at the Tate Modern because he thought they were similar,” he says. “I was blown away.”

David Martin

Street Art: Andrew Howard

Andrew Howard Street Art

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Andrew Howard is from London and is a regular contributor to Street Art, working across a range of mediums from painting to poetry. He has struggled with mental health problems since 1986. His latest artwork (pictured above) responds to, he says, “the lunacy of knife crime”.

Andrew Howard Street Art Print

Street Art: Chris B And Mina

Chris B & Mina

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Chris B was born in central London and draws to relieve depression and anxiety. He also writes stories and has published several drawings in The Big Issue as well as other magazines. Mina came to London as a political exile. She has experienced an abusive relationship and strives to empower herself with art and photography. Mina and Chris work together on art projects.

Chris B & Mina

 

Street Art: David Tovey

David Tovey Aunt Jean

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

David Tovey is an ex-homeless artist and founder of the ONE Festival of Homeless Arts. “Being a social artist means I like to raise awareness of issues that are close to my heart,” he says, “this is a portrait I’ve just finished of my beautiful aunt (pictured above) who is living with dementia. Dementia is cruel and not only does it take the life of the person living with it, but also all of those around them. This picture is for the strength of my cousins.”

“Back in December one of my closest friends died in such an awful way,” he says of this oil painting on paper. “He stopped eating and solely survived on alcohol, he stopped taking his medication and his body slowly and painfully shut down on him. This great man helped me when I was at my lowest point and it pains me that I couldn’t help him. So I decided to immortalise him in a piece of art (pictured below).”

David Tovey

Street Art: Paul Gorman

Paul Gorman Street Art Prints The Big Issue Shop

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Paul Gorman is 51 and has been living in his own flat for almost a year now following a long period of homelessness. He did this acrylic on canvas painting titled, View of Building, at an art class run by Loaves and Fishes, a charity helping homeless and vulnerable people in Salford and Manchester. “It started from looking at a German print,” he explains, “then I added my own background and colour.”

Jeremy Deller – conceptual, video and installation artist and Turner Prize Winner – on View of Building by Paul Gorman:

“I really like this. I can totally understand it. This kind of work is the kind of work I would make if I were painting – something like a fantasy almost of a building, almost like he’s a frustrated architect. I like the simplicity of it, there’s a lot of charm about it. It’s quite heartfelt as well. Work like that is something I can really enjoy. Art is a way of escaping a certain reality, possibly, and you can see that here especially in the subject matter, which is about where you live, it’s a home. It makes it more poignant. You can see he really enjoyed making it.”

Street Art: Mango

Mango Big Issue Street Art

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

A London based graffiti artist and photographer, Mango has been spray painting on the underground scene for about 24 years, both in London and Europe, initially ‘illegally’ but more recently with commissioned work. Mango has an eclectic mix of art skills and techniques. He is also known for his gothic art, anatomical studies and dark landscapes. His gothic pieces portray a melancholic expression of Mango’s ‘darker side’ reflective of his life and background.

Mango Street Art Prints

Street Art: James Sneddon

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Canterbury Big Issue vendor James Sneddon has been sleeping rough since 2011. “Art has given me something positive and productive to put my energy into,” he says. “The picture of the Afghan hounds was for a lady called Cecilia who moved back to Norway and unfortunately never got to see the picture of her dogs. The picture of three paratroopers standing on the beach at Dunkirk waiting for the boats was my interpretation of a photo on the front of the Times newspaper. I was not sure if people would like it but it has been well received. I would like to thank The Big Issue for letting me be a vendor as trying to survive on art alone was very precarious. My life has been and still is difficult but I hope things will improve.”

Street Art: Robyn Forman

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Robyn Forman is one such individual and describes what her work is about. “My work is about healing, forgiveness and reconciliation. Medicine leaves are a natural source and the medicine that I take that leaves the body. My other artwork available to buy is ‘Tapestry’ (see below) is about emotions weaving. Managing to get the correct dosage of medication for my bi-polar and Rheumatoid Arthritis has been crucial to enable me to recover. My inspiration is also about recovery, everyday I feel I am in recovery. When I work on a piece of art I go into a zone that is meditative. Making art also helps give me some relief from the chronic pain and stresses of managing everyday life”.

Street Art: Chris Gray

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

“I’m 49 years old and have a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia which is largely under control by the correct medication,” says Chris Gray. “I grew up in Littlehampton and I’ve lived in Brighton for over 20 years. I’ve been using computers to create images, animations, interactive pieces and music since the early 1990s. These images are hand drawn then treated and colourised in Photoshop.”