House of Gharats is empowering women with The Big Issue Shop

house of gharats

Vendor Spotlight: House of Gharats

The newest addition brings a passion for Indian arts to their stylish pocket squares and scarves

The newest addition to The Big Shop is putting the power to tackle poverty in your pocket. Fashionable family-run House of Gharats investigates and re-interprets the role of Indian art, craft and culture and gives it a twist in the context of contemporary British and global design.

Each of its scarves and pocket squares are designed in London using co-founder Neishaa Gharat’s passion for Indian culture as a template.

The beautifully intricate designs are then brought to life in the finest silk twill in Italy alongside custom illustrative art.

The rare opportunity to indulge in wearing and gifting a piece of art truly sets House of Gharats Limited Edition Silk Scarf Collection apart. As Neishaa Gharat explains: “House of Gharats was born out of the love of living an artful life with purpose. House of Gharats is a design house, fusing cultures and blurring the lines between art and fashion, producing a delightful approach to everyday dressing and living.

“We are driven by the values of art and craft in contemporary design and as a result, our designs are timeless objects that can be passed down through the generations.”

But the best bit about House of Gharats’ distinctively stylish, yet inherently classic designs is how it educates and empowers girls and women through supporting the Food for Life Vrindavan program.

With 21 per cent of its profits from supporting the initiative, the goal is to create a sustainable future, free from poverty.

Available now in The Big Issue Shop, House of Gharats’ scarves are the perfect size to act as neckerchiefs and pocket squares, making for an ideal gift for men and women, even offering the chance to team up for a unique ‘his and hers’ gift set.

View House of Gharats’ collection in our Shop here.

Get ready for the cold snap with GLOW’s nifty knitwear

GLOW-Beanies

The temperatures are dropping and it is so dark outside that the light that bathed us throughout summer seems a long way away.

The autumn months and winter slog can get your down but the Big Issue Shop is here to light the way with the wonderful woollen creations from GLOW.

The social enterprise is the brainchild of London fashion designer and stylist Comet Chukura and offers knitwear that will make you stand out from the crowd, literally.

Each design is hand crocheted by disadvantaged women in London enabling them to hone work skills while providing them with a supplementary income and allowing them to become part of a greater community.

The goal is to change how consumers wear and interact with ethical, functional-fashionable pieces that look good, do good and feel good.

GLOWbeanie

And the results are packed with warmth and protection, featuring a light-reflective fibreglass fused into the fibres of the yarn. Although you can’t feel it on your skin, you will see it when it catches the light, living up to the GLOW billing.

This means every garment is ideal for helping the chic commuter, the dog walker or a parent or child who cares about their safety, their appearance and social impact in ethical fashion.

The luxurious and adaptable range is available from The Big Issue Shop with a colourful collection of snug snoods and insulating hats.

And as if you weren’t spoilt for choice enough, there are two types of snood to make sure you stay warm and on top of the trends.

You can play it classic with the Twist Snood, a knitwear staple that can be adjusted to be worn loosely or for a tighter, more snug fit. Or, if that doesn’t do the trick, then the Cuff Hood offers the snuggest fit of all, providing an optimum shield from the cold.

And you needn’t worry about your brain box either – with a selection of hats also on offer to keep the cold at bay.

Shop the collection here

Vendor Spotlight: Elephant Branded

“The idea of Elephant Branded is like The Big Issue in that it is run like business, not a charity, and shows that business can be a force for good.”

That’s the view of James Munro Boon, co-founder of Elephant Branded – a social enterprise that make bags, laptop cases and wallets out of recyclable materials to make a difference.

For every one sold, a child in Cambodia gets a school bag to help them with their studies.

“The idea of Elephant Branded is like The Big Issue in that it is run like a business, not a charity, and shows that business can be a force for good.”

That’s the view of James Munro Boon, co-founder of Elephant Branded – a social enterprise that make bags, laptop cases and wallets out of recyclable materials to make a difference.

For every one sold, a child in Cambodia gets a school bag to help them with their studies.

“To be honest, that’s the only reason I do it,” he says. “I go out there every three or four months and that has been since uni when I was spending all my student loan on flights out there every five or six months.

“I’ve seen kids growing up and have their own children thanks to the work we do. I love spending time there and I think that the really valuable thing is where we support people to run their own business and build their own lives.”

While Elephant Branded faces a constant battle to find new recyclable materials – with a struggle to find a waste material available in high volume that doesn’t vary in quality and consistency – it is constantly attempting to innovate with new products on the way.

But the original three ranges of products are available in The Big Issue Shop.

“As well as the exposure, I think working with The Big Issue adds a degree of credibility,” says James.

“Just like how it is wrong for me to Cambodia and tell people what to do and how to run their business, The Big Issue gives vendors a chance to work their way out of poverty.

“And I think that people who buy The Big Issue have the same ethos and concerns as we do. I’ve met a family in Cambodia that I would never have had a chance to meet and that’s where I see the synergy with The Big Issue.”