Street Art: David Tovey

David Tovey Aunt Jean

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

David Tovey is an ex-homeless artist and founder of the ONE Festival of Homeless Arts. “Being a social artist means I like to raise awareness of issues that are close to my heart,” he says, “this is a portrait I’ve just finished of my beautiful aunt (pictured above) who is living with dementia. Dementia is cruel and not only does it take the life of the person living with it, but also all of those around them. This picture is for the strength of my cousins.”

“Back in December one of my closest friends died in such an awful way,” he says of this oil painting on paper. “He stopped eating and solely survived on alcohol, he stopped taking his medication and his body slowly and painfully shut down on him. This great man helped me when I was at my lowest point and it pains me that I couldn’t help him. So I decided to immortalise him in a piece of art (pictured below).”

David Tovey

Street Art: Paul Gorman

Paul Gorman Street Art Prints The Big Issue Shop

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Paul Gorman is 51 and has been living in his own flat for almost a year now following a long period of homelessness. He did this acrylic on canvas painting titled, View of Building, at an art class run by Loaves and Fishes, a charity helping homeless and vulnerable people in Salford and Manchester. “It started from looking at a German print,” he explains, “then I added my own background and colour.”

Jeremy Deller – conceptual, video and installation artist and Turner Prize Winner – on View of Building by Paul Gorman:

“I really like this. I can totally understand it. This kind of work is the kind of work I would make if I were painting – something like a fantasy almost of a building, almost like he’s a frustrated architect. I like the simplicity of it, there’s a lot of charm about it. It’s quite heartfelt as well. Work like that is something I can really enjoy. Art is a way of escaping a certain reality, possibly, and you can see that here especially in the subject matter, which is about where you live, it’s a home. It makes it more poignant. You can see he really enjoyed making it.”

Street Art: Mango

Mango Big Issue Street Art

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

A London based graffiti artist and photographer, Mango has been spray painting on the underground scene for about 24 years, both in London and Europe, initially ‘illegally’ but more recently with commissioned work. Mango has an eclectic mix of art skills and techniques. He is also known for his gothic art, anatomical studies and dark landscapes. His gothic pieces portray a melancholic expression of Mango’s ‘darker side’ reflective of his life and background.

Mango Street Art Prints

Street Art: James Sneddon

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Canterbury Big Issue vendor James Sneddon has been sleeping rough since 2011. “Art has given me something positive and productive to put my energy into,” he says. “The picture of the Afghan hounds was for a lady called Cecilia who moved back to Norway and unfortunately never got to see the picture of her dogs. The picture of three paratroopers standing on the beach at Dunkirk waiting for the boats was my interpretation of a photo on the front of the Times newspaper. I was not sure if people would like it but it has been well received. I would like to thank The Big Issue for letting me be a vendor as trying to survive on art alone was very precarious. My life has been and still is difficult but I hope things will improve.”

Street Art: Robyn Forman

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Robyn Forman is one such individual and describes what her work is about. “My work is about healing, forgiveness and reconciliation. Medicine leaves are a natural source and the medicine that I take that leaves the body. My other artwork available to buy is ‘Tapestry’ (see below) is about emotions weaving. Managing to get the correct dosage of medication for my bi-polar and Rheumatoid Arthritis has been crucial to enable me to recover. My inspiration is also about recovery, everyday I feel I am in recovery. When I work on a piece of art I go into a zone that is meditative. Making art also helps give me some relief from the chronic pain and stresses of managing everyday life”.

Street Art: Chris Gray

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

“I’m 49 years old and have a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia which is largely under control by the correct medication,” says Chris Gray. “I grew up in Littlehampton and I’ve lived in Brighton for over 20 years. I’ve been using computers to create images, animations, interactive pieces and music since the early 1990s. These images are hand drawn then treated and colourised in Photoshop.”

Street Art: Michael Crosswaite

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

After years spent travelling and squatting, Michael Crosswaite ended up homeless in London with a drug habit. “I got into a hostel and eventually got myself clean,” he says. “Now I’ve got a Peabody Flat and things are cool. With my painting my thing is humour. The more ridiculous the better. I loved Monty Python and the whole silliness thing. I think the world is a very silly place and hopefully this comes though in my pictures.”

Street Art: Tangerine

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Tangerine is a mixed media artist, photographer and graphic designer born in Italy in 1979 and now living in Brighton. “Art has always been a very important part of my life,” she says, “I have been trying to create something new and personal, looking at the inner side of my personality, along with the experience of anxiety and social issues. I am really inspired by music and my artworks always try to express what music means to me.”

Street Art: Carmel Woods

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

Carmel Woods, who submits her work via London homeless charity the 240 Project, describes herself as “a lone wolf”. “My work comes straight out my head, it’s happy and sad,” she says. “At the end of the day, how you feel comes out on the paper, in the colours and the shapes. I get inspired by people at the project and value their comments, we are like a family they give you honest advice.”

Street Art: Rene Robbins

 

Street Art: Giving Marginalised Individuals an Outlet for Creative Expression

Every week in The Big Issue, our Street Art page gives talented, marginalised individuals an outlet for creative expression, as well as a platform to sell their prints through The Big Issue Shop.

The daughter of an architect, Rene Robbins enjoys working with geometric shapes, line and collage. Following the death of her husband and son, she experienced a period of homelessness. At a low point one of her friends invited her to attend an art project and she has been returning ever since. “There’s always something new to see or learn,” says Rene. She works slowly and patiently due to a degenerative eye condition. Several of her works have been published and sold at exhibitions.